Tuesday, 27 May 2014

Eames House - Case Study House Nº8



By the end of World War II appeared Case Study Houses as an experiment in USA recycling used armament. In this way, we find the Eames House as an example of inexpensive and efficient prototype homes in California.


Charles and Ray Eames built their own house in 1949 facing the sea though the shade of huge eucalyptus trees. The house, which serves as both their home and studio, is made with a prefabricated steel frame, accented with an array of windows and brightly colored panels that play with scale and texture.


This prefabricated system allowed the frame to be built in only 90 hours. Apart from steel, the structure is also composed of a long concrete retaining wall which holds the slope behind.



Two adjacent buildings maximize the internal space with double height, found at the living room and studio, which besides create a stronger connection between the interior and the exterior eucalyptus trees. This is one long sentence.

Positioning the living room and studio adjacently across a courtyard maximizes the internal space. Besides, by making these two spaces double height the Eameses create a stronger connection between the interior spaces and the eucalyptus trees.



This house is a mix of work and life integrated in pure nature. Moreover, the atmosphere environment where the house is placed situated, produced enhanced by the ¿wood? (madera o bosque?) and the sound of the sea makes a luxurious lifestyle. 

Javier Ostos.


By the end of World War II appeared Case Study Houses as experiment in USA recycling used armament. In this way, we find Eames House as an example of inexpensive and efficient homes in California.

Charles and Ray Eames built their own house in 1949 faced to the sea under shadows of huge eucalyptus throthough it. The house, which serves as both their home and studio, is made with a prefabricated steel frame, accented with an array of windows and brightly colored panels.

This prefabricated system allowed the frame was been built in only 90 hours. Apart from steel, the structure is also composed of a long concrete retaining wall wich holds the slope behind.

Two adjacent buildings maximize the internal space with double high, found at the living room and studio, which besides create a stronger connection between the interior and the exterior eucalyptus trees.

This house is a mix of work and life integrated in pure nature. Moreover, the atmosphere, where the house is placed, produced by the wood and the sea sound makes a luxurious lifestyle.

1 comment:

  1. Javier, I love this house and I think that you've written a really good description of it. Apart from the small query about the word 'wood', the description is very clear. The same confusion would arise for a native speaker too so don't worry.

    I think that you've chosen excellent images to accompany the text. The view from the property is something I never appreciated, so often you see it from the same angle.

    It has a lot in common with the Smithson's school at Hunstanton, both being post-war prefabricated structures, and perhaps some of the language from that description would have been useful.

    When you used the word 'wood' I didn't know if you meant the wood of the building (madera - material) or the wood in which the house is situated (bosque).

    It is such a shame that the Eames' proposal was never a success, Although saying that, it does seem very much an American home and I couldn't imaging living in a similar house here.

    A great description, well done, Martin

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