Wednesday, 28 May 2014

SUSTAINABLE ARCHITECTURE

Sustainable architecture is a response to current needs. Architecture that consumes little energy in its manufacture and will consume as little as possible in its operation.

 


As basic approaches we can look at of situation, volumes, facades and roofs.

Situation


You must know the weather data and to incorporate passive design measures. As fundamentals are:
  • temperature
  • direction
  • humidity
  • solar radiation
  • wind
To achieve better comfort, you have to take into account the orientation and direction of the prevailing winds, proximity to wetlands, harnessing solar radition and natural ventilation.

Two things, the sentence us a bit confused and reads better:

To achieve better comfort you should take the proximity to wetlands into account and also the orientation of the building in order to harness solar radiation and natural ventilation from the prevailing winds.


Another sentence from Murcutt you could have used: Sustainable architecture should respond to climatic conditions and function without air conditioning or heating through controlling sunlight penetration and manipulating the breezes.

Volumes



The optimal form of the building is based on searching the thermal balance: lower reducing heat loss in winter and heat gain in summer less. This depends on the type of weather. In extreme climates as optimal the optimum form would be compact volumes.

Sectorization Division of housing is also recommended: Near ¿Distinguish between? night vs day area, for increased energy demand, more or less depending on occupancy.

Facade



The facade must harness solar radiation, natural lighting and ventilation. The holes apertures are also key elements. In colder climates larger apertures that allow heat and solar gain are advisable. Whereas in warm climates the holes apertures must be protected to prevent excessive heat gain the temperature rise, also called the greenhouse effect.

Roof



The roof is the most important element as it can be exploited for passive use of solar radiation, passive cooler element and natural light. You can also pipe and collect water or use a roof garden which has the advantages of thermal and acoustic insulation. 

Manuel Gómez Pérez

Sustainable architecture is a response to a current needs. It is designed and built more efficiently and lower costs.
As basic approaches find aspects of situation, volumes, facades and roofs.

Situation

You must know the weather data and to incorporate passive design measures. As fundamentals are: temperature, direction, humidity, solar radiation and wind.
To achieve better comfort, you have to take into account the orientation direction of the prevailing winds, proximity to wetlands, harnessing solar radition and natural ventilation.

Volumes

The optimal form of the building is based on searching the thermal balance: lower heat loss in winter and heat gain in summer less. This depends on the type of weather. In extreme climates as optimal are compact volumes.
Sectorization of housing is also recommended: Near night vs day area, for increased energy demand, more or less depending on occupancy.

Facade

The facade must harness solar radiation, natural lighting and ventilation. The holes are also key elements.
In cold weather it is advisable large holes that allow heat and solar gain. In warm climates the holes must be protected to prevent the temperature rise, also called the greenhouse effect.

Roof

The roof is the most important element in the sun. This can be exploited as passive use of solar radiation, passive cooler element and natural light. You can also pipe and collect water or use a roof garden.
Roof garden has advantages of thermal and acoustic insulation. 

1 comment:

  1. Manuel, I'm always interested to read about environmental approached to architecture. And I think that you've structured it in a very logical way that is easy to follow. I think you've written an appropriate amount for each part of the blog entry and I feel informed after finishing reading which is most important in a factual piece like this.

    I think the images work well, but perhaps a diagram, like the one we saw when looking at 'retrofit' might give extra depth to the understanding of some of the technical aspects.

    Well done, Martin

    ReplyDelete